Tag Archives: Ray Rice

Seeing is Feeling – How Video Shapes Public Opinion

Ray Rice was caught on video assaulting his fiancé and has since been cut by his team, suspended indefinitely, and become a pariah. Greg Hardy was convicted of assaulting his girlfriend in July and he is quietly playing football with the Carolina Panthers as if nothing happened. Donald Sterling, due to a number of lawsuits and allegations over the years, was widely believed to be a racist, but he managed to be an owner for 30 years with virtually no complaints from any of the players or NBA executives. But when he was caught on tape telling his girlfriend that he did not want her going to games with black people, the NBA and the general public were outraged and he was forced to sell his team.

We always knew that Ray Rice knocked out his fiancé in that elevator, which was why there was a negative reaction to the original 2 game suspension. The NFL, after listening to all the criticism over the 2 game suspension, changed its policy so that in the future, a player would receive a six game suspension for domestic abuse. Then when the second Ray Rice video was released showing us exactly what we already knew, the NFL then suspended Rice indefinitely. Many have pointed out that it seems the real reason why Rice’s suspension is so long is that he happened to be caught on tape.

Leaving aside the discussion of what would have been an appropriate punishment for Ray Rice, it is intriguing how much more outrage the public feels when they actually see the incident with their own eyes. It is important to keep in mind that this is not a case where the video clarified guilt or innocence; we always knew that Rice assaulted his fiancé in that elevator and then dragged her out like a sack of potatoes. It was seeing it that caused the outrage.

The lesson I take from all of this is not simply that people are hypocrites, but rather that people may need to something with their own eyes before they truly know their opinion of it. Maybe people should hold off on forming strong opinions on something until they have seen it with their own eyes. How many supporters of the death penalty would have the same position if they had to watch prisoners being executed? On the flipside, how many people who typically favor leniency and early parole for convicts would feel the same way if they were forced to watch the actual violent crimes that were committed?

The same people that are now outraged over Ray Rice’s original two game suspension and calling for Roger Goodell’s head never batted an eye over the years as one player after another was convicted of domestic abuse and didn’t face a single game suspension. Those stories just faded into the background just like all those nightly stories on Ebola outbreaks, civil wars, famines, and child poverty reports. We hear the stories, conceptually we agree they are terrible, and then we clean up the dishes.

Over the past year we heard stories about this group in Syria that were so violent even Al Qaeda disowned them, but collectively we just shrugged off the thousands of deaths until we saw a video of a hostage being barbarically beheaded. Now we are going to war with them. If ISIS had massacred an entire village of 10,000 people that day instead of posting the video footage of killing that journalist, they would not be the target airstrikes right now. If Greg Hardy’s assault had been videotaped instead of Ray Rice’s, Hardy would be suspended and Rice would be playing football this weekend. Seeing isn’t just believing, seeing is feeling.

Ray Rice Fiasco Highlights Widespread Phoniness in Professional Sports

Pardon my ignorance, but what exactly did we learn with the release of the video of Ray Rice hitting his fiancé in that Atlantic City elevator? We knew they were alone in the elevator. We knew that she was conscious when she stepped into the elevator. We knew that Ray Rice knocked her unconscious in the elevator. Nobody was suggesting that the woman fainted or slipped on a banana peel. Rice was after all charged with domestic abuse. Keep in mind that the original video did not show Janay Rice staggering out of the elevator clutching her face, it showed her completely motionless and unconscious on the floor.

Did people think that he merely pushed her away to ward off her violent attack? This is a person whose job it is to get violently tackled 25 times a game by 250+ pound men. Often 2-3 such men combine to tackle him, and intelligent people supposedly believed that he couldn’t withstand the onslaught from his fiancé for the 20 seconds it would have taken for the door to open? If Ray Rice’s fiancé was trying to beat him to death he could have held her off with one hand and drank a cup of hot coffee with the other without spilling a drop.

Before the second video, many sports commentators stated that Rice’s two game suspension was about right, though some publicly wondered if the penalty might have even been too harsh. Adam Schefter even posed the unfortunate question of whether the NFL was “lenient enough”. Now that the second video has been released the media is coming at the NFL and Roger Goodell with torches and pitchforks. It’s as if sports commentators had no idea that knocking a woman unconscious could look so distasteful until they saw that second video.

The reality is that members of the sports media, like most human beings, still have an instinct to stick with the herd. When the critical mass of public opinion began reacting with outrage to the second video, everyone sprinted off the front of the mob. The Ravens organization, which had the cluelessness to tweet about Janay Rice accepting her responsibility for the incident, promptly cut Rice and all the commentators who were once so quick to move on to the next story were all over the TV and radio voicing their outrage.

This is much the same as what happened with Donald Sterling. For years people had accused Sterling of discriminating against minorities and actually settled a huge lawsuit related to housing discrimination. Despite Sterling’s reputation, he carried on as an owner for decades and even had the league block a trade of Chris Paul to his team’s biggest rival, thus allowing Sterling to make his own trade for Paul. But when social media exploded over the leak of tape where he was caught telling his mistress he didn’t want her going to games with black people, everyone in the sports world was suddenly outraged and Sterling was forced from the league.

The phoniest people of all in this story is the top brass of the NFL, particularly Roger Goodell himself. In the span of just a few weeks he has adjusted his position on domestic abuse three times. First he felt a two game suspension for knocking your fiancé unconscious was sufficient. Then when many people voiced their anger that two games for domestic abuse was woefully inadequate given he had just suspended someone a year for smoking marijuana, he told us that he had reconsidered and that in the future players would get a 6 game suspension for domestic abuse but that they would not change Ray Rice’s original suspension. Then when everybody went crazy over the second video, he changed his mind again and said that Rice would be suspended indefinitely. Some might argue that this is uncharted territory for the NFL and they have now learned their lesson on the seriousness of domestic violence. That argument might hold some water if not for the fact that the most famous murder trial in the country’s history involved a star running back who abused his wife.